Saturday, 5 September 2015

Viagra versus Addiya - its not the same deal with it.

Post updated September 15 to clarify that Addiya does not work for men.

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The news that Addiya the women's libido drug was approved by the FDA has been met with joy in some quarters and scepticism in some parts. So I thought I would give a run down of the biggest misconception that is being used by the press and basically uneducated people. Firstly, I am not saying Addiya should not be approved as it does seem to have genuinely positive benefits for some limited disorders. But let us continue and bold face the flawed argument.

Addiya is not Viagra!

This simple concept is being thrown a round by many people that are ignorant to what Addiya and Viagra actually are. Addiya is the first ever drug to treat sexual desire disorder in men and women. The fact that the word first is highlighted here shows that this drug is not the same compared to Viagra which is a vasodilator i.e. it can give you an erection. That means that even if you have an erection it does not mean you have a desire to have sex, sorry ladies it really is that simple. On the other hand Addiya promotes sexual desire and as such it gets the women that has taken it wanting to have sex. This simple reason is why I am so annoyed with the shocking news reporting that has followed the FDA approval of this drug. This false equivocation has given the drug egalitarian and feminist groups a reason to push for the release of this drug by claiming equality, yet it is not an equal drug.

So you may ask, why do I care?

(Source)

Simply put, there are still concerns about the safety of the drug. In fact, the FDA only decided to approve Addiya based on the fact that the manufacturer Valeant has to run three more drug tests on the interaction between alcohol and the drug. So all in all while this is a win for women's libido this is not necessarily the greatest news considering that the drug got approved yet still needs recommended drug tests.

Then of course there is the massive chance for abuse of the drug. We cannot just deny that this is probably not going to happen. Think about what happened with the abuse of  Rohypnol. However, in this case it will be a far more serious issue as you cannot prove that something consensual (increased libido means increased sexual desire) was in fact not consensual. This just contributes to a problem we don't need, as in effect it could happen that the person is having sex because they want but in reality they would not. Please, try understand this point as I think it is important.

Lastly, if you do not want sex then why would you take a drug to have sex. Now I probably am viewing this way to simplistically, so don't rage on this point as there are far better ones to rage on above. If you as a women don't want to have sex, why would you take a drug that makes you want to have sex? Is it not easier to just not have sex? Or alternatively, let your partner go get his sex somewhere else and then everyone is happy. I know this is a way out concept, but is it really when someone is essentially forcing themselves to have unwanted sex.

So there you have it, the facts and my take on a drug that has genuine benefits, however lets be clear these benefits are limited.